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Viva Question and Answers Related to the class 1 Dental Cavities

Here are 25 viva questions and answers related to Class I dental cavity preparation:

Question 1: What is a Class I dental cavity?

Answer: A Class I dental cavity involves the pits and fissures on the occlusal surfaces of posterior teeth and the buccal and lingual pits of molars.

Question 2: What are the primary causes of Class I cavities?

Answer: Class I cavities are primarily caused by the accumulation of bacteria and food debris in the pits and fissures of the occlusal surfaces.

Question 3: Describe the steps involved in the preparation of a Class I cavity.

Answer: The steps include tooth isolation, cavity design, enameloplasty, dentin preparation, and restoration placement.

Question 4: Why is isolation important during cavity preparation?

Answer: Isolation prevents contamination and moisture, ensuring a clean and dry environment for successful cavity preparation and restoration.

Question 5: What instruments are commonly used for Class I cavity preparation?

Answer: Common instruments include high-speed handpieces, burs, excavators, and dental mirrors.

Question 6: How do you differentiate between enamel and dentin during cavity preparation?

Answer: Enamel is hard and glossy, while dentin is softer and usually has a yellowish color. The use of air/water spray or a dental explorer can help differentiate them.

Question 7: What is the purpose of enameloplasty in Class I cavity preparation?

Answer: Enameloplasty involves reshaping the enamel margins to ensure a smooth transition and provide a better surface for bonding the restoration.

Question 8: Why is it important to remove carious dentin during cavity preparation?

Answer: Carious dentin must be removed to eliminate bacteria and prevent the spread of decay. It ensures a clean surface for the restoration to adhere. Viva question and answers related to different types of Dental burs

Question 9: What factors influence the choice of restorative material for Class I cavities?

Answer: Factors include the location of the cavity, esthetic concerns, and the strength required. Common materials include amalgam and composite resin.

Question 10: How do you achieve retention in Class I cavity preparation?

Answer: Retention is achieved by creating features like grooves and undercuts, ensuring the restoration stays securely in place.

Question 11: What is the purpose of cavity liners in Class I restorations?

Answer: Cavity liners are used to protect the pulp from irritation and improve the sealing of the restoration.

Question 12: How do you check the occlusion after placing a Class I restoration?

Answer: Occlusion is checked using articulating paper to ensure proper tooth alignment and prevent interference during biting.

Question 13: Why is it important to polish the restoration after placement?

Answer: Polishing removes rough edges, enhances esthetics, and reduces the risk of plaque accumulation on the restoration.

Question 14: What precautions should be taken to avoid iatrogenic damage during cavity preparation?

Answer: Proper handpiece control, using the right pressure, and avoiding excessive heat generation are crucial to prevent iatrogenic damage.

Question 15: What is the significance of a bevel in Class I cavity preparation?

Answer: A bevel improves the adaptation of restorative materials, especially in enamel margins, enhancing the longevity of the restoration.

Question 16: How do you manage bleeding during cavity preparation?

Answer: Use astringent agents or hemostatic agents and ensure proper isolation to control bleeding effectively.

Question 17: What are the potential complications of inadequate moisture control during cavity preparation?

Answer: Inadequate moisture control can compromise the bonding of restorative materials, leading to restoration failure.

Question 18: Why is it important to consider the patient’s medical history before cavity preparation?

Answer: Certain medical conditions and medications may affect bleeding, healing, or the choice of materials used during cavity preparation.

Question 19: What precautions should be taken when dealing with pediatric patients during Class I cavity preparation?

Answer: Patience, communication, and behavior management techniques are crucial when treating pediatric patients to ensure cooperation and a positive experience. Viva Question and Answers Related to Dental Anatomy

Question 20: How does cavity preparation in primary teeth differ from permanent teeth?

Answer: Cavity preparation in primary teeth often requires special considerations due to their smaller size, thinner enamel, and the proximity of pulp.

Question 21: What is the purpose of a rubber dam in Class I cavity preparation?

Answer: A rubber dam provides optimal isolation, preventing contamination and improving the overall success of the restoration.

Question 22: How do you determine the depth of the cavity during preparation?

Answer: The depth is determined by the extent of caries or decay, with the aim of removing all affected dentin and ensuring a proper foundation for the restoration.

Question 23: What is the role of adhesive systems in Class I cavity restorations?

Answer: Adhesive systems enhance the bond between the restoration and the tooth structure, improving longevity and preventing microleakage.

Question 24: How do you manage postoperative sensitivity after Class I cavity preparation?

Answer: Postoperative sensitivity can be managed by using desensitizing agents or recommending fluoride treatments to strengthen tooth structure.

Question 25: How often should patients with Class I restorations undergo follow-up examinations?

Answer: Regular follow-up examinations, typically every six months, are recommended to monitor the integrity of the restoration and overall oral health.

question and answers in class 1 cavity filling

Here are 20 viva questions and answers related to Class I cavity filling:

Question 1: What is a Class I cavity?

Answer: A Class I cavity is a dental cavity that involves the pits and fissures on the occlusal surfaces of posterior teeth and the buccal and lingual pits of molars.

Question 2: What restorative materials are commonly used for Class I cavity fillings?

Answer: Common restorative materials for Class I cavity fillings include dental amalgam and composite resin.

Question 3: How do you choose between amalgam and composite resin for a Class I restoration?

Answer: The choice depends on factors such as esthetic concerns, location of the cavity, and patient preference. Composite resin is often preferred for its esthetic qualities, while amalgam is known for its durability.

Question 4: What steps are involved in the placement of a Class I amalgam restoration?

Answer: Steps include cavity preparation, placement of a matrix band, amalgam condensation, carving, and finishing.

Question 5: How is the bonding process different in Class I composite resin restorations compared to amalgam?

Answer: Composite resin requires bonding agents to adhere to the tooth structure, while amalgam relies on mechanical retention.

Question 6: What is the purpose of a matrix band in Class I cavity filling?

Answer: A matrix band is used to create a tight seal around the tooth, assisting in the proper contouring of the restoration.

Question 7: How do you ensure proper adaptation of amalgam to the cavity walls during placement?

Answer: Proper condensation techniques, using appropriate instruments, and ensuring the removal of excess mercury are essential for achieving optimal adaptation.

Question 8: What are the advantages of using composite resin for Class I restorations?

Answer: Composite resin offers esthetic benefits, can be bonded to tooth structure, and requires less removal of healthy tooth structure compared to amalgam. Viva Question and Answers in Class 2 dental cavity

Question 9: How do you manage postoperative sensitivity in patients with Class I composite resin restorations?

Answer: Postoperative sensitivity can be managed by using desensitizing agents and ensuring proper isolation and bonding techniques during restoration placement.

Question 10: What precautions should be taken when handling dental amalgam during Class I restoration?

Answer: Precautions include proper ventilation, avoiding skin contact, and ensuring the safe disposal of amalgam waste following environmental regulations.

Question 11: How do you achieve proper contouring and shaping of a Class I composite resin restoration?

Answer: Proper contouring is achieved through incremental layering and shaping with dental instruments, followed by polishing for a smooth surface.

Question 12: What is the role of curing lights in Class I composite resin restorations?

Answer: Curing lights are used to polymerize and harden the composite resin, ensuring its strength and durability.

Question 13: Can you explain the concept of incremental layering in composite resin restorations?

Answer: Incremental layering involves placing composite resin in small increments, curing each layer separately. This technique reduces the risk of shrinkage and improves the adaptation of the material.

Question 14: How do you assess the occlusion after placing a Class I restoration?

Answer: Occlusion is assessed using articulating paper to ensure proper tooth alignment and prevent interference during biting.

Question 15: What are the challenges associated with Class I restorations in pediatric patients?

Answer: Challenges may include behavior management, moisture control, and the need for smaller-sized instruments suitable for pediatric dentistry.

Question 16: What is the significance of finishing and polishing in Class I restorations?

Answer: Finishing and polishing enhance esthetics, comfort, and reduce the risk of plaque accumulation, contributing to the overall success of the restoration.

Question 17: How do you manage overhanging margins in Class I restorations?

Answer: Overhanging margins should be carefully identified and corrected using appropriate instruments to avoid issues with occlusion and gingival health.

Question 18: What role does isolation play during the placement of Class I restorations?

Answer: Isolation is crucial to maintain a dry and clean environment, preventing contamination and ensuring the success of the restoration.

Question 19: How do you address secondary caries in a tooth with a Class I restoration?

Answer: Regular follow-up examinations are essential to detect and address secondary caries early. The restoration may need replacement if decay is identified.

Question 20: What postoperative instructions should be given to patients with new Class I restorations?

Answer: Patients should be advised to avoid chewing on the restored tooth immediately after the procedure, follow proper oral hygiene practices, and report any discomfort or issues promptly. Regular follow-up appointments are also recommended.

Here are 20 viva questions and answers related to restorations for Class I cavity:

Question 1: What is a Class I cavity, and where is it commonly found?

Answer: A Class I cavity involves the pits and fissures on the occlusal surfaces of posterior teeth and the buccal and lingual pits of molars.

Question 2: What are the primary goals of restoring a Class I cavity?

Answer: The primary goals include the removal of carious tooth structure, restoration of the tooth’s form and function, and prevention of further decay.

Question 3: Which restorative materials are commonly used for Class I cavity restorations?

Answer: Common restorative materials include dental amalgam, composite resin, and glass ionomer cement.

Question 4: How do you determine the choice of restorative material for a Class I cavity?

Answer: The choice depends on factors such as esthetic considerations, the location of the cavity, patient preference, and the clinician’s judgment.

Question 5: What are the advantages of using dental amalgam for Class I restorations?

Answer: Dental amalgam is durable, cost-effective, and has a long track record of clinical success.

Question 6: What are the advantages of using composite resin for Class I restorations?

Answer: Composite resin provides better esthetics, can be bonded to tooth structure, and requires less removal of healthy tooth structure.

Question 7: How do you prepare a tooth for a Class I restoration?

Answer: The preparation involves removing carious tissue, creating a suitable cavity design, and providing proper isolation.

Question 8: Why is isolation crucial during Class I restoration?

Answer: Isolation prevents contamination and moisture, ensuring a clean and dry environment for successful restoration placement.

Question 9: Explain the process of bonding in Class I composite resin restorations.

Answer: Bonding involves etching the tooth surface, applying an adhesive, and curing the composite resin with a light source for a strong bond.

Question 10: How do you achieve proper contouring and shaping of a Class I restoration?

Answer: Proper contouring is achieved through careful layering of restorative material, carving, and finishing to recreate the natural tooth anatomy. Viva Questions and Answers Related to Cementum

Question 11: What is the purpose of a matrix band in Class I restoration?

Answer: A matrix band provides the proper contour for the restoration and helps create a tight seal around the tooth.

Question 12: How do you manage postoperative sensitivity in patients with Class I restorations?

Answer: Postoperative sensitivity can be managed by using desensitizing agents and ensuring proper isolation and bonding techniques during restoration placement.

Question 13: What precautions should be taken when handling dental amalgam during Class I restoration?

Answer: Precautions include proper ventilation, avoiding skin contact, and following safety guidelines for handling and disposing of amalgam.

Question 14: Why is finishing and polishing important after placing a Class I restoration?

Answer: Finishing and polishing enhance esthetics, comfort, and reduce the risk of plaque accumulation, contributing to the overall success of the restoration. Viva Questions and Answers Related to Tongue thrust Habit

Question 15: How often should patients with Class I restorations undergo follow-up examinations?

Answer: Regular follow-up examinations, typically every six months, are recommended to monitor the integrity of the restoration and overall oral health.

Question 16: What challenges might you face when restoring a Class I cavity in pediatric patients?

Answer: Challenges may include behavior management, moisture control, and the need for smaller-sized instruments suitable for pediatric dentistry.

Question 17: How do you handle overhanging margins in a Class I restoration?

Answer: Overhanging margins should be carefully identified and corrected using appropriate instruments to avoid issues with occlusion and gingival health.

Question 18: What are the signs of a successful Class I restoration?

Answer: A successful restoration should exhibit proper adaptation to the cavity walls, good contour and anatomy, minimal postoperative sensitivity, and esthetic integration with surrounding teeth.

Question 19: How do you address secondary caries in a tooth with a Class I restoration?

Answer: Regular follow-up examinations are essential to detect and address secondary caries early. The restoration may need replacement if decay is identified. Viva Question and Answers Related to Cement Bases in Dentistry

Question 20: What postoperative instructions should be given to patients with new Class I restorations?

Answer: Patients should be advised to avoid chewing on the restored tooth immediately after the procedure, follow proper oral hygiene practices, and report any discomfort or issues promptly. Regular follow-up appointments are also recommended.

Here are some potential viva questions and answers related to the classification of dental cavities:

Question 1: What is the classification of dental cavities based on location?

Answer: Dental cavities can be classified based on location into three main types: occlusal cavities (on the biting surfaces of the teeth), proximal cavities (found between adjacent teeth), and smooth-surface cavities (occurring on the smooth surfaces of teeth).

Question 2: Can you explain the classification of dental cavities based on the extent of involvement?

Answer: Dental cavities can be classified based on the extent of involvement into three categories: incipient or initial cavities (affecting only the enamel), moderate cavities (involving both enamel and dentin), and advanced or severe cavities (extending into the pulp).

Question 3: How are dental cavities classified according to the number of surfaces involved?

Answer: Dental cavities can be classified based on the number of surfaces involved into single-surface cavities (affecting only one surface of the tooth), two-surface cavities (involving two surfaces), and multi-surface cavities (affecting more than two surfaces).

Question 4: What is the classification of dental cavities based on the age of the patient?

Answer: Dental cavities can be classified based on the age of the patient into primary teeth cavities (affecting baby teeth) and permanent teeth cavities (occurring in adult teeth).

Question 5: How do you classify dental cavities by the type of tooth involved?

Answer: Dental cavities can be classified based on the type of tooth involved into anterior cavities (affecting front teeth) and posterior cavities (occurring in back teeth). Viva Question and Answers in Classification and uses of Casting Gold Alloys in Dentistry

Question 6: Explain the classification of dental cavities according to the surface structure.

Answer: Dental cavities can be classified based on the surface structure into pit and fissure cavities (occurring in the deep grooves and pits of the teeth) and smooth-surface cavities (affecting the flat surfaces of the teeth).

Question 7: Can you discuss the classification of dental cavities based on etiology?

Answer: Dental cavities can be classified based on etiology into primary cavities (resulting from bacteria and their byproducts) and secondary cavities (arising due to factors such as trauma, defective restorations, or systemic conditions).

Question 8: What are the stages of the classification of dental cavities?

Answer: The stages of the classification of dental cavities include the early or initial stage, moderate stage, and advanced or severe stage, depending on the extent of involvement and progression of the cavity.

These questions and answers should provide a comprehensive understanding of the classification of dental cavities for a viva examination.

 

 

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