You are here: Home » Dental Care » Viva Question and Answers Related to the Skull

Viva Question and Answers Related to the Skull

  1. Q: What are the functions of the skull?
  • A: The skull protects the brain, supports sensory organs, and provides structure for facial features.
  • Q: How many bones are there in the human skull?
  • A: There are 22 bones in the human skull.
  • Q: Name the two main parts of the skull.
  • A: The two main parts are the cranium and the mandible.
  • Q: Which bones make up the cranium?
  • Q: What is the function of the mandible?
  • A: The mandible (lower jaw) facilitates chewing, talking, and supports the lower teeth.
  • Q: Which bone forms the forehead?
  • A: The frontal bone forms the forehead.
  • Q: What is the function of the parietal bones?
  • A: The parietal bones help form the top and sides of the skull, protecting the brain.
  • Q: Where is the temporal bone located, and what structures does it house?
  • A: The temporal bone is located on the sides of the skull and houses the ear structures and the mandibular joint.
  • Q: What is the foramen magnum, and where is it located?
  • A: The foramen magnum is a large opening at the base of the skull through which the spinal cord passes. It is located in the occipital bone.
  1. Q: What is the purpose of the sphenoid bone?
  • A: The sphenoid bone helps form the base of the skull and contributes to the eye sockets.
  1. Q: Which bone contains the pituitary gland?
  • A: The sphenoid bone contains a depression called the sella turcica, which houses the pituitary gland.
  1. Q: What is the function of the ethmoid bone?
  • A: The ethmoid bone contributes to the formation of the eye sockets and the nasal cavity.
  1. Q: What are fontanelles?
  • A: Fontanelles are soft spots on a baby’s skull where the bones have not yet fused.
  1. Q: Which bone articulates with the first cervical vertebra (atlas)?
  • A: The occipital bone articulates with the first cervical vertebra (atlas).
  1. Q: What is the purpose of the nasal conchae?
  1. Q: Which bones form the nasal septum?
  • A: The vomer and the perpendicular plate of the ethmoid bone form the nasal septum.
  1. Q: What is the significance of the zygomatic bones?
  • A: The zygomatic bones contribute to the structure of the cheek and the formation of the eye sockets.
  1. Q: Which bone contains the external auditory meatus?
  • A: The temporal bone contains the external auditory meatus, the opening of the ear canal.
  1. Q: What is the role of the mastoid process?
  • A: The mastoid process serves as an attachment point for muscles and provides protection to the inner ear.
  • Q: Name the two bones that make up the lower jaw.
  • A: The lower jaw is made up of the mandible and the maxilla.
  • Q: What is the function of the hyoid bone?
  • A: The hyoid bone supports the tongue and provides attachment for certain throat muscles.
  • Q: Which bone forms the back of the skull and contains the foramen magnum?
  • A: The occipital bone forms the back of the skull and contains the foramen magnum.
  • Q: What is the function of the sella turcica?
  • Q: What is the importance of the cranial sutures?
  • A: Cranial sutures are fibrous joints that allow for limited movement during childbirth and skull growth.
  • Q: Where is the coronal suture located?
  • A: The coronal suture is the joint between the frontal and parietal bones.
  • Q: Which bones form the bony orbits that house the eyes?
  • A: The frontal, sphenoid, zygomatic, maxilla, palatine, ethmoid, and lacrimal bones contribute to the bony orbits.
  • Q: What is the function of the palatine bones?
  • A: The palatine bones contribute to the formation of the hard palate in the mouth.
  • Q: Which bone contains the cribriform plate?
  • A: The ethmoid bone contains the cribriform plate, through which olfactory nerves pass.
  • Q: What is the purpose of the styloid process?
  • A: The styloid process serves as an attachment point for muscles and ligaments in the neck.
  • Q: How does the structure of the fetal skull differ from that of an adult?
  • A: The fetal skull has fontanelles, softer bones, and a different bone composition to facilitate passage through the birth canal.

 Here are 30 viva questions and answers related to the foramina (plural of foramen) of the skull:

  1. Q: What is a foramen in the context of the skull?
  • A: A foramen is an opening or hole in a bone, typically for the passage of blood vessels, nerves, or ligaments.
  • Q: Name a prominent foramen located in the occipital bone.
  • Q: What passes through the foramen magnum?
  • A: The spinal cord passes through the foramen magnum.
  • Q: Where is the foramen ovale located, and what passes through it?
  • A: The foramen ovale is located in the sphenoid bone, and it allows the passage of the mandibular branch of the trigeminal nerve (V2).
  • Q: Which foramen in the skull accommodates the optic nerve?
  • A: The optic canal accommodates the optic nerve.
  • Q: Name the foramen that is part of the sphenoid bone and houses the pituitary gland.
  • A: The sella turcica is the depression in the sphenoid bone that houses the pituitary gland.
  • Q: What passes through the foramen rotundum?
  • A: The maxillary branch of the trigeminal nerve (V2) passes through the foramen rotundum.
  • Q: Where is the foramen spinosum located, and what passes through it?
  • A: The foramen spinosum is located in the greater wing of the sphenoid bone, and it transmits the middle meningeal artery.
  • Q: What is the function of the foramen lacerum?
  • A: The foramen lacerum is filled with cartilage in life and does not transmit any major nerves or vessels.
  1. Q: Which foramen allows the passage of the internal carotid artery into the cranial cavity?
  1. Q: What passes through the stylomastoid foramen?
  • A: The facial nerve (cranial nerve VII) passes through the stylomastoid foramen.
  1. Q: Where is the foramen magnum located, and what structures does it connect?
  • A: The foramen magnum is located in the occipital bone and connects the cranial cavity to the vertebral canal.
  1. Q: What is the function of the jugular foramen?
  • A: The jugular foramen allows the passage of the internal jugular vein and several cranial nerves, including the glossopharyngeal, vagus, and accessory nerves.
  1. Q: Where is the hypoglossal canal located, and what passes through it?
  • A: The hypoglossal canal is located in the occipital bone, and the hypoglossal nerve (cranial nerve XII) passes through it.
  1. Q: What is the purpose of the foramen spinosum?
  • A: The foramen spinosum transmits the middle meningeal artery.
  1. Q: Which foramen is located between the greater wing and the petrous part of the temporal bone?
  • A: The foramen ovale is located between the greater wing and the petrous part of the temporal bone.
  1. Q: What structures pass through the foramen cecum?
  • A: In some individuals, emissary veins may pass through the foramen cecum.
  1. Q: Where is the infraorbital foramen located, and what does it transmit?
  1. Q: What passes through the mental foramen?
  • A: The mental foramen transmits the mental nerve and vessels.
  • Q: Which foramen is located in the palate and transmits the greater palatine vessels and nerve?
  • A: The greater palatine foramen transmits the greater palatine vessels and nerve.
  • Q: What is the function of the foramen of the cribriform plate?
  • A: The foramen of the cribriform plate allows the passage of olfactory nerves, responsible for the sense of smell.
  • Q: Where is the foramen of the cribriform plate located?
  • A: The foramen of the cribriform plate is located in the ethmoid bone.
  • Q: What passes through the foramen infraorbital?
  • A: The infraorbital nerve and vessels pass through the foramen infraorbital.
  • Q: Where is the foramen magnum located in relation to the occipital condyles?
  • A: The foramen magnum is located anterior to the occipital condyles.
  • Q: What is the function of the foramen caecum?
  • A: The foramen caecum serves as the embryonic remnant of the thyroglossal duct.
  • Q: Which foramen is associated with the transmission of the abducent nerve (cranial nerve VI)?
  • A: The abducent nerve passes through the superior orbital fissure, not a foramen.
  • Q: What is the purpose of the foramen of Huschke?
  • A: The foramen of Huschke is an abnormal opening in the temporal bone, allowing communication between the external auditory canal and the temporomandibular joint.
  • Q: Which foramen is associated with the passage of the chorda tympani nerve?
  • A: The chorda tympani nerve passes through the petrotympanic fissure, not a foramen.
  • Q: Where is the foramen spinosum located in relation to the foramen ovale?
  • A: The foramen spinosum is located lateral to the foramen ovale.
  • Q: What is the significance of the foramina in the skull?
  • A: Foramina play a crucial role in allowing the passage of nerves, blood vessels, and other structures between different regions of the skull and connecting it with adjacent structures.

Here are 20 viva questions and answers related to the sutures of the skull:

  1. Q: What are sutures in the context of the skull?
  • A: Sutures are fibrous joints between the bones of the skull, allowing some degree of movement during childbirth and accommodating skull growth.
  • Q: Name the major sutures in the adult human skull.
  • Q: Where is the coronal suture located, and which bones does it connect?
  • A: The coronal suture is located between the frontal bone and the parietal bones.
  • Q: What is the significance of the sagittal suture?
  • A: The sagittal suture connects the two parietal bones along the midline of the skull.
  • Q: Which suture is located at the posterior part of the skull and connects the parietal bones with the occipital bone?
  • A: The lambdoid suture connects the parietal bones with the occipital bone.
  • Q: What is the function of the squamous suture?
  • A: The squamous suture connects the parietal and temporal bones on each side of the skull.
  • Q: How do fontanelles differ from sutures?
  • A: Fontanelles are soft spots between the bones in the skull of a baby, whereas sutures are fibrous joints between the bones in the adult skull.
  • Q: During what stage of life do fontanelles typically close?
  • Q: What is the purpose of sutures in the skull?
  • A: Sutures provide flexibility during childbirth and allow for the growth of the skull bones, accommodating brain development.
  1. Q: Which suture separates the frontal bone from the parietal bones and is particularly visible in newborns?
  • A: The frontal suture separates the frontal bone from the parietal bones and is also known as the metopic suture in newborns.
  1. Q: How are sutures different from syndesmoses or gomphoses?
  • A: Sutures are fibrous joints between skull bones, while syndesmoses are fibrous joints with more collagenous fibers found in other parts of the body, and gomphoses are specialized joints found in teeth sockets.
  1. Q: What is craniosynostosis?
  • A: Craniosynostosis is a condition where one or more of the sutures in an infant’s skull close too early, affecting normal skull and brain growth.
  1. Q: Which suture connects the parietal bones with the temporal bones?
  • A: The squamous suture connects the parietal bones with the temporal bones.
  1. Q: What is the role of the metopic suture in prenatal development?
  • A: The metopic suture is a midline suture that closes during prenatal development, contributing to the formation of the frontal bone.
  1. Q: Which cranial sutures are classified as “squamous”?
  • A: The squamous sutures include the squamous suture (parietal-temporal) and the squamous part of the sphenoid bone.
  1. Q: How do sutures contribute to skull stability?
  • A: While sutures allow some movement, their fibrous nature provides stability and strength to the overall structure of the skull.
  1. Q: What is the function of the midpalatal suture?
  • A: The midpalatal suture is a dense fibrous joint that fuses the palatal bones, contributing to the stability of the upper jaw.
  1. Q: Which suture is associated with the closure of the anterior fontanelle in infants?
  • A: The coronal suture is associated with the closure of the anterior fontanelle in infants.
  1. Q: What is the term for the process of sutures fusing over time?
  • A: The process of sutures fusing over time is called cranial suture closure or cranial suture fusion.
  • Q: How can abnormalities in sutures affect the skull and brain?
  • A: Abnormalities in sutures, such as premature closure or delayed closure, can lead to conditions like craniosynostosis, affecting skull shape and potentially causing increased intracranial pressure.

Leave a Reply